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Map Name

Willard, Emma, 1787-1870

Emma Willard, “Introductory” Map of American History
This map opened one of the first historical atlases of America, created by the noted educator Emma Willard. Note that she marked not just the location of tribes, but their migration over time.

(1828) | Chapter 1 | View the Map »

Map Name

Willard, Emma, 1787-1870

Emma Willard, “First” Map of American History
Willard’s second map in the atlas marked the earliest voyages to America, and took pains to represent change over time. Note the inclusion of failed voyages and settlements..

(1828) | Chapter 1 | View the Map »

Map Name

Willard, Emma, 1787-1870

American Temple of Time
In the American edition, Willard drew the outline of the continental nation as the backdrop, and asked students to detail the nation’s history and geography on the floor, ceiling, and pillars.

(1860) | Chapter 1 | View the Map »

Map Name

Willard, Emma, 1787-1870

Emma Willard, “Ninth” Map of American History
In her final map of the historical atlas, Willard proudly asserted the admission of new states in the trans-Mississippi west, and detailed the transfer of territory from native tribes to the Union.

(1828) | Chapter 1 | View the Map »

Map Name

Willard, Emma, 1787-1870

Chronographical Plan of Willard’s History of the United States
Willard used a tree to depict American history as a unified whole even as the nation was descending into Civil War. Though designated a history of the “U. States,” it begins with Columbus.

(1864) | Chapter 1 | View the Map »

Map Name

Willard, Emma, 1787-1870

The Temple of Time
Willard designed this graphic to teach the relationship between geography and history: the ceiling marks individuals, coordinated by pillars of time and the growth of nations on the floor.

(1857) | Chapter 1 | View the Map »

Map Name

Willard, Emma, 1787-1870

Perspective Sketch of the Course of the Empire
Willard designed this comprehensive “picture of nations” to capture the advent of different civilizations, from the beginnings of recorded history down to her own day.

(1835) | Chapter 1 | View the Map »