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Map Name

Willard, Emma, 1787-1870

Emma Willard, “First” Map of American History
Willard’s second map in the atlas marked the earliest voyages to America, and took pains to represent change over time. Note the inclusion of failed voyages and settlements..

(1828) | Chapter 1 | View the Map »

Map Name

Elliott, G. W.

Map of the United States, Showing by Colors the Area of Freedom and Slavery
One of many maps created for the 1856 election. The dark lines across the interior represent the expeditions of John Fremont, Republican candidate for president.

(1856) | Chapter 4 | View the Map »

Map Name

Warren, G. K. (Gouverneur Kemble), 1830-1882

Map of the Territory of the U.S. from the Mississippi to the Pacific Ocean
This was one of the first comprehensive maps of the maps, considered the most authoritative for years after it was compiled in connection with the railroad surveys of the 1850s.

(1855) | Chapter 2 | View the Map »

Map Name

Blanchard, Rufus, 1821-1904

Historical Map of the United States
Inspired by the nation’s centennial, Blanchard used both new and facsimile maps to showcase the history of exploration.

(1876) | Chapter 2 | View the Map »

Map Name

Kohl, J. G. (Johann Georg), 1808-1878

Map of the Discovery of the East Coast of the United States
Kohl’s map of the east coast used vibrant color to depict phases of exploration as waves upon the shore. Note his careful discussion on the map of the voyages of Sebastian Cabot.

(1856) | Chapter 2 | View the Map »

Map Name

Willard, Emma, 1787-1870

Emma Willard, “Ninth” Map of American History
In her final map of the historical atlas, Willard proudly asserted the admission of new states in the trans-Mississippi west, and detailed the transfer of territory from native tribes to the Union.

(1828) | Chapter 1 | View the Map »

Map Name

Warren, G. K. (Gouverneur Kemble), 1830-1882

Map of the Territory of the United States from the Mississippi River to the Pacific (1858)
This is one of the first comprehensive maps of the west, considered the most authoritative for several decades, and prompted by the railroad surveys of the 1850s.

(1858) | Chapter 2 | View the Map »