Search Results

Map Name

Walker, Francis Amasa, 1840-1897

Map Showing the Distribution of the Constitutional Population
Walker’s map of population density established the categories that would be used on all his subsequent population maps in blue ink, enabling viewers to compare classes of information.

(1874) | Chapter 5 | View the Map »

Map Name

Walker, Francis Amasa, 1840-1897

Map Showing the Proportion of Deaths from Consumption to Deaths from All Causes
Walker chose several categories to map, including the incidence of different diseases and their relative effect on death rates.

(1874) | Chapter 5 | View the Map »

Map Name

Brewer, William Henry, 1828-1910

Map Showing the Distribution of Woodland
Francis Walker took care to include the latest maps of the physical landscape in his Statistical Atlas, in order to set the stage for the comprehensive population maps that would follow.

(1874) | Chapter 5 | View the Map »

Map Name

Walker, Francis Amasa, 1840-1897

Map Showing the Proportion of the Colored to the Aggregate Population
Like the map of the foreign population above, this one was one of the first that enabled the viewer to think about the African American population in reference to the population as a whole.

(1874) | Chapter 5 | View the Map »

Map Name

Walker, Francis Amasa, 1840-1897

Map of the “Colored Population” Compiled from the Ninth Census
This map illustrated the black population in absolute terms rather than as a proportion of the overall population, as the Coast Survey’s map of slavery in 1861 had done.

(1872) | Chapter 5 | View the Map »

Map Name

Witzleben, Arthur de

Map of the Distribution of Illiteracy Compiled from the Ninth Census
Walker applied the new thematic mapping techniques from Europe to every aspect of American life that he could quantify, including disease, wealth, literacy, and ethnicity.

(1872) | Chapter 5 | View the Map »

Map Name

Witzleben, Arthur de

Four Small Maps of Ethnicity, Compiled from the Ninth Census
Walker paid close attention to mapping ethnic groups within the U.S., and these efforts became even more sophisticated in the Statistical Atlas of 1874.

(1872) | Chapter 5 | View the Map »

Map Name

Witzleben, Arthur de

Irish Population. Compiled from the Ninth Census
Here Walker mapped ethnic groups in density per square mile; later he would improve on this technique by adding the density of the overall population in order to facilitate comparison.

(1872) | Chapter 5 | View the Map »

Map Name

Witzleben, Arthur de

Map of the “Foreign Population” Compiled from the Ninth Census
This was one of Walker’s first attempts to map census data, and contemporaries noticed the stark comparison between it and the map of the “colored population” from the same report.

(1872) | Chapter 5 | View the Map »

Map Name

Witzleben, Arthur de

Map of the Distribution of Wealth Compiled from the Ninth Census
By mapping the distribution of wealth, disease, literacy, and other characteristics, Walker gave Americans entirely new ways to think about their nation.

(1872) | Chapter 5 | View the Map »

Map Name

Witzleben, Arthur de

German Population. Compiled from Ninth Census
Francis Amasa Walker’s census maps of ethnicity were tailored to each group, and starkly illustrated their patterns of settlement in different parts of the country.

(1872) | Chapter 5 | View the Map »

Map Name

Henry, Joseph, 1797-1878

Temperature Chart of the United States
With this and other physical maps, Census Superintendent Francis Walker revealed his interest in thinking about the population in the widest possible terms.

(1872) | Chapter 5 | View the Map »

Map Name

Galpin, Samuel Arthur, d. 1902

Maps of the Pacific Coast Exhibiting Various Subjects
By using the same base map to identify several different ethnic groups, Walker enabled the viewer to draw connections about patterns of migration and settlement.

(1874) | Chapter 5 | View the Map »

Map Name

Walker, Francis Amasa, 1840-1897

Map of the Shifting Center of National Population, 1790-1870
Julius Hilgard innovated the technique of identifying the “center” of population at each decennial census, which had a profound effect on Frederick Jackson Turner’s concept of the frontier.

(1874) | Chapter 5 | View the Map »

Map Name

Witzleben, Arthur de

United States. Area: Acquisition and Transfer of Territory 1780 to 1870
The abbreviations on this map refer to Francis Walker’s comprehensive narrative, which detailed the territorial growth of the nation, from the colonial era down to his own day.

(1872) | Chapter 5 | View the Map »

Map Name

Walker, Francis Amasa, 1840-1897

Map Showing the Illiteracy of the Aggregate Population
Here Walker used a map to compare the distribution of two classes of information (rates of illiteracy and population density), introducing what is now a common analytical use for maps.

(1874) | Chapter 5 | View the Map »

Map Name

Walker, Francis Amasa, 1840-1897

Map Showing the Proportion of the Foreign to the Aggregate Population
Here Walker introduced Americans to a new kind of map that mapped information. Here population density is outlined in blue ink, while the foreign population is shaded in color.

(1874) | Chapter 5 | View the Map »

Map Name

Steinwehr, A. von (Adolph), 1822-1877

Map of the River Systems of the United States
Steinwehr was one of several skilled mapmakers who emigrated to the U.S. prior to the Civil War. This map integrates steam and wind power with agriculture to measure productivity.

(1874) | Chapter 5 | View the Map »

Map Name

Witzleben, Arthur de

Map of Population Density Compiled from the Ninth Census
Here designed this early map of the 1870 census convince Congress to fund an atlas of the census. Walker’s decision to map density reflected his concern with the growth of urbanization.

(1872) | Chapter 5 | View the Map »

Map Name

Walker, Francis Amasa, 1840-1897

Title page from Statistical Atlas of the United States
Walker’s Statistical Atlas, with maps executed by Julius Bien, was one of the first of its kind, and continues to command attention for its path-breaking use of maps and graphic illustration.

(1874) | Chapter 5 | View the Map »