Search Results

Map Name

Statistical Map of North America
This is typical for its time: the title claims it as “statistical,” the data is simply listed on the map. Soon thereafter maps would begin to represent statistics through shading and other techniques.

(1841) | Chapter 4 | View the Map »

Map Name

Freedom and Slavery, and the Coveted Territories
Anti-slavery activist John Jay used this map to alert northerners to the threat of slavery in the west, and to promote the cause of the newly-founded Republican Party in the 1856 presidential election.

(1856) | Chapter 4 | View the Map »

Map Name

Elliott, G. W.

Map of the United States, Showing by Colors the Area of Freedom and Slavery
One of many maps created for the 1856 election. The dark lines across the interior represent the expeditions of John Fremont, Republican candidate for president.

(1856) | Chapter 4 | View the Map »

Map Name

Leigh, Edwin

A View of the Relation of Slaves to Agricultural Wealth in Missouri
Leigh designed several maps to demonstrate the relative inefficiency of slave labor in Missouri, yet this includes so much information as to be difficult to understand.

(1862) | Chapter 5 | View the Map »

Map Name

Atkinson, Edward, 1827-1905

The Cotton Kingdom
Atkinson designed this map to convince northerners to embrace the Emancipation Proclamation as a path to a more efficient system of free labor.

(1863) | Chapter 4 | View the Map »

Map Name

Olmsted, Frederick Law, 1822-1903

The Cotton Kingdom and its Dependencies
Olmsted issued this map in the midst of the secession crisis to convince the British to withhold support for the Confederacy; it is the first attempt to measure cotton production on a map.

(1861) | Chapter 4 | View the Map »

Map Name

Hergesheimer, E. (Edwin)

Map Showing the Distribution of the Slave Population of the Southern States
One of the first American attempts to translate the census into cartographic form, and a favorite of President Lincoln during the Civil War.

(1861) | Chapter 4 | View the Map »

Map Name

Reynolds, William C.

Reynolds's Political Map of the United States
One of several maps made to promote Republican John Fremont’s campaign for president in 1856. Note that Kansas is highlighted, the center of violent conflict over slavery.

(1856) | Chapter 4 | View the Map »

Map Name

Smith, John F.

Historical Geography
Notice the zealously sectional interpretation of history in this map, especially the identification of northern liberty as emanating from Christianity, in contrast to southern slavery.

(1888) | Chapter 2 | View the Map »

Map Name

Carpenter, F. B. (Francis Bicknell), 1830-1900

First Reading of the Emancipation Proclamation of President Lincoln
In this iconic portrait, Carpenter carefully reproduced the Coast Survey’s map of slavery in the lower right corner after noticing Lincoln’s attention to it.

(1864) | Chapter 4 | View the Map »

Map Name

Graham, H. S. (Henry S.)

Map of Virginia and its Slave Population (June 1861)
The Coast Survey executed this map just as Virginians were debating secession in order to highlight the different interests around slavery in the state.

(1861) | Chapter 4 | View the Map »

Map Name

Graham, H. S. (Henry S.)

Map of Virginia and its Slave Population (August 1861)
The Coast Survey’s second map of Virginia was modified to reflect to growing division in that state during the secession crisis. Note the identification of “Kanawha.”

(1861) | Chapter 4 | View the Map »

Map Name

Graham, H. S. (Henry S.)

Map of Virginia and its Slave Population (September 1861)
The final edition of the Virginia slave map used Census data to pointedly illustrate the relative absence of slaves from the western half of the state.

(1861) | Chapter 4 | View the Map »

Map Name

Petermann, A. (August), 1822-1878

Map of Slavery in the U.S., Based on the Census of 1850
A European was the first to map American census data. The map at lower left shades the density of the slave population, and identifies the number of slaves per square mile.

(1855) | Chapter 4 | View the Map »