Search Results

Map Name

Maury, Matthew Fontaine, 1806-1873

The Washington Map of the United States, by M.F. Maury (1861)
The “Washington Map” was continually updated through the 1860s to reflect the availability of new information, as with the Eighth Census of 1860.

(1861) | Chapter 3 | View the Map »

Map Name

Blodget, Lorin, 1823-1901

Map of Temperature and Rainfall
Blodget published several maps of seasonal and annual rainfall, the result of decades of observations collected by the Smithsonian, the Army, and other federal agencies.

(1861) | Chapter 3 | View the Map »

Map Name

Willard, Emma, 1787-1870

American Temple of Time
In the American edition, Willard drew the outline of the continental nation as the backdrop, and asked students to detail the nation’s history and geography on the floor, ceiling, and pillars.

(1860) | Chapter 1 | View the Map »

Map Name

Hilgard, J. E. (Julius Erasmus), 1825-1891

Sketch of the Rebellion for 1862
This is the Coast Survey’s prototype for a map that captured the state of the rebellion in spring 1862. Note the detailed legend in the lower left marking battle sites and troop routes.

(1862) | Chapter 2 | View the Map »

Map Name

Lindenkohl, H. (Henry)

Historical Sketch of the Rebellion (1863)
Each of these “sketches” attempted to tell the story not just of the latest state of affairs, but the progress over the war over time.

(1863) | Chapter 2 | View the Map »

Map Name

Lindenkohl, H. (Henry)

Historical Sketch of the Rebellion (1864)
The Coast Survey published several of these maps during the war, each of which detailed the progress of Union control as well as the relative population of the loyal and insurgent states.

(1864) | Chapter 2 | View the Map »

Map Name

Smith, John F.

Historical Geography
Notice the zealously sectional interpretation of history in this map, especially the identification of northern liberty as emanating from Christianity, in contrast to southern slavery.

(1888) | Chapter 2 | View the Map »

Map Name

Willard, Emma, 1787-1870

Chronographical Plan of Willard’s History of the United States
Willard used a tree to depict American history as a unified whole even as the nation was descending into Civil War. Though designated a history of the “U. States,” it begins with Columbus.

(1864) | Chapter 1 | View the Map »

Map Name

Neuman & Dinglinger, Lithographers

Chronological Chart of American History
Dalston’s chart is a variation on Emma Willard’s tree of time, and detailed early growth in the roots out to recent developments in the branches. Note the stages of social progress.

(1881) | Chapter 1 | View the Map »

Map Name

Paullin, Charles Oscar, 1868 or 9-1944

Conquest of the South, 1861-1865
Here the Civil War is represented in stages, as popularized by Henry Lindenkohl and the U.S. Coast Survey in the “Sketches of the Rebellion,” included above.

(1932) | Chapter 2 | View the Map »

Map Name

Willard, Emma, 1787-1870

The Temple of Time
Willard designed this graphic to teach the relationship between geography and history: the ceiling marks individuals, coordinated by pillars of time and the growth of nations on the floor.

(1857) | Chapter 1 | View the Map »

Map Name

Ramsay, David, 1749-1815

A Map Historical and Biographical Chart of the United States
At left is Ramsay’s map of the new nation, accompanied by his attempt to “chart” the American past since 1607, directly inspired by the timelines of Joseph Priestley.

(1811) | Chapter 1 | View the Map »

Map Name

Henshaw, Frances A.

Frances Henshaw, Title Page to her Book of Penmanship
Henshaw was a student at the Middlebury Female Academy, and her journal reveals much about contemporary lessons in geography and penmanship.

(1828) | Chapter 1 | View the Map »

Map Name

Henshaw, Frances A.

Descriptive Picture of Virginia
Alongside each hand-drawn state map, Henshaw visually rendered a description of each state to inscribe it in her memory.

(1828) | Chapter 1 | View the Map »

Map Name

Henshaw, Frances A.

Descriptive Picture of Kentucky
Henshaw’s picture of Kentucky indicates that she was taught to arrange material geographically, the same spatial approach to learning promoted by Emma Willard.

(1828) | Chapter 1 | View the Map »

Map Name

Sparks, John B.

The Histomap: Four Thousand Years of World History
This graphic depiction of history evokes Emma Willard’s “picture of nations” a century earlier, and was one of Rand McNally’s most popular sellers in the twentieth century.

(1925) | Chapter 2 | View the Map »